Archive for Yuri Ivlev

M-1 Challenge: Team Spain vs. Team Russia Legion

Posted in M-1 Challenge, TV Reports with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 23, 2008 by jaytan716

Last week, the Team Finland vs. Team Red Devil meet aired several weeks ahead of its scheduled broadcast.  However, tonight continues the chronological sequence, as Team Spain takes on Team Russia Legion for third place in Group B.

Currently, Team Spain is tied for second place with Team Japan, standing 1-0 in team challenges and 3-2 in individual matches.  Team Russia Legion is just behind the pair, standing 0-1 in team challenges and 2-3 in individual matches.  A victory for Team Russia Legion would shift them into a three-way tie with Team Spain and reigning top dog Team Holland, pushing Team Japan to fourth place.  A dominating match performance of 4-1 or better would solidify Russia Legion’s second place status in individual matches, which could be just enough of an edge to help them usurp Team Holland from the #1 spot.  For Team Spain, victory will propel them to the top of the overall team standings.

This meet originally took place on June 27th of this year in St. Petersburg, Russia.  As always, announcers Sean Wheelock and Jimmy Smith are on-hand to call the matches.

Lightweight Division:  Carlos Valeri (Team Spain) vs. Yuri Ivlev (Team Russia Legion)

Although Carlos Valeri has an experience advantage by five matches, his Achilles heel is in defending against submissions, having lost at least five times to chokes and armbars.  Yuri Ivlev’s previous match was an explosive bout that he conceded to Daisuke Nakamura.by decision.

Round One:  Valeri has a significant height and reach advantage over Ivlev, which illustrates a recurring “David vs. Goliath” that will play out for the rest of the night.  Regardless, Ivlev, a judo and sambo expert, is unphased, and attacks with a flurry of strikes, including a surprise spinning back kick to the head.  Valeri is trying to get control of the pace of the match, but Ivlev sticks with his fundamentals and takes Valeri down with a textbook hip toss.  Ivlev opts to keep the match standing. Once Valeri is on his feet again, Ivlev attacks with another combination of strikes and subsequent hip toss, right into an armbar.  Valeri doesn’t even try to fight it before he taps out at 2:31 of the first round.  Awesome finish.

This is what an MMA Jamie Noble would look like, if he were booked to win.

Team Russia Legion is on the boards 1-0.

Welterweight Division:  Juan Manuel “Juanma” Suarez (Team Spain) vs. Islam Karimov (Team Russia Legion)

“Juanma” Suarez is undefeated, with a series of victories prior making his M-1 debut in May.  Islam Karimov, a sambo and karate expert, hopes to redeem himself after a TKO loss to Team Japan’s Ken Hamamura.

Round One:  Again, Suarez towers over Karimov.  But Karimov takes the fight to Suarez, forcing him into the corner with a front kick and punch combination.  Suarez jumps into guard, but Karimov controls the momentum and slams Suarez onto the mat.  The next few minutes are a jiu-jitsu chess match, as Suarez works for triangles and armbars, both off his back and in mid-air, as Karimov attempts another slam escape.  Suarez is meticulous with his grappling, but Karimov, for his part, is composed and doesn’t flinch at the sign of danger.  Finally, Suarez sweeps Karimov, gets his hooks in, and attacks from above with submission attempts and ground-and-pound openings.  Suarez gets to his feet briefly, but then passes guard and takes mount control just as the round ends.

This is a great jiu-jitsu demonstration for the uninitiated fan.  Round One goes to Suarez for the ground dominance.

Round Two:  Karimov quickly drops Suarez with a kick-overhand right combination.  Suarez goes back to the well and tries to jump guard, but Karimov has learned his lesson and works to keep the fight standing.  Karimov peppers kicks to Suarez’ legs.  Suarez finally gets up and lands some rights, driving Karimov back.  Another jump guard against the ropes.  Referee Victor Korniev orders a stand up.  Suarez campaigns for a position restart in the middle of the ring, arguing that he was attempting a submission.  Great success for Suarez!  Kimura, sweep, stand-up.  Jump guard, sweep attempt.  Wash, rinse, repeat.  Karimov grounds Suarez to the mat with a waist clinch until the round runs out.  As expected, Suarez takes the decision.

Team Spain ties the meet at 1-1.

Middleweight Division:  Eulogio Fernandez (Team Spain) vs. Ansar Chalangov (Team Russia Legion)

Eulogio Fernandez makes his MMA debut tonight.  Ansar Chalangov, a two-time UFC veteran from 2005-2006, was caught in a rear naked choke in his last M-1 Challenge match.  Aside from the obvious experience gap, the difference is a wash.

Round One:  Fernandez is jumpy and nervous.  Chalangov wants his redemption.  He shoots for a double-leg takedown and bulls Fernandez into the corner.  Fernandez keeps a tight guard on the ground, but Chalangov works from the feet, going for a standing toehold in the corner.  He gets caught in the ropes slightly, but Fernandez taps at 1:20 of the first round.  Chalangov breaks his 4-match losing streak.

Team Russia Legion regains the meet lead, 2-1.

Light Heavyweight Division:  Rafael Rodriguez (Team Spain) vs. Besike Gerinava (Team Russia Legion)

Rafael Rodriguez has several more matches under his belt than Besike Gerinava, but the Russian sports an unblemished 5-0 record.  Gerinava has strong takedown skills and is dangerous on the ground.  His previous outing was a decision victory against Yuji Sakuragi.

I didn’t remember Gerinava being so hairy in his match against Sakuragi.  Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear, which makes Gerinava a Wookie.

Round One:  Rodriguez replaces Spanish MMA star Daniel Tavera in M-1 competition.  Gerinava charges Rodriguez and takes him down.  Rodriguez, who’s sporting a Dingo Warrior-style armband tied around his right arm, closes guard and keeps a clinch on the ground.  Gerinava escapes the guard and stands up.  Both try for leglocks.  Rodriguez sinks in a guillotine choke in the corner and weathers a Gerinava slam to the mat.  The Russian finally escapes the choke and opens guard with a can opener.  Gerinava takes side control, then the back, and sinks in a rear naked choke before Rodriguez taps at 4:57 of the round.  Jimmy Smith comments that with seconds left in a round, it’s better to pass out and hope to beat the clock rather than tap.  Clearly, Rodriguez’s strategy was “let the Wookie win.”

Team Russia Legion clocks in their third win, securing the team victory, 3-1.

Heavyweight Division:  Rogent Lloret (Team Spain) vs. Akmed Sultanov (Team Russia Legion)

Rogent Lloret is a relative newcomer to the sport, but he’s already fought outside his home country, taking on far more experienced competition (including Jared Hamman and Brazil’s Edson Paredao).  Sultanov (3-0) is a wrestler who scored a quick armbar victory against Katsuhisa Fujii.

Round One:  The two heavyweights feel each other out before clinching up.  Lloret trips Sultanov to the ground, working eventually to full mount.  He spins for an armbar, but Sultanov escapes.  They scramble for position, but Lloret ends up back in Sultanov’s guard, then side mount.  Lloret’s record betrays his skills, as he is very composed and adept on the ground.  Lloret wins the round for control, striking, and submission attempts.

Round Two:  As could be expected, Lloret is more relaxed, while Sultanov seems jarred.   Sultanov tags Lloret nicely with a hard right, but quickly gets taken down again.  Sultanov attempts a leglock, but Lloret takes full mount and starts to drop bombs.  Sultanov creates distance from the ground by arching his back with accompanying body lock.  Lloret tries unsuccessfully for an Americana; he’s able to keep full mount with little threat of being swept, but his ground and pound isn’t effective enough to finish the big Russian.  Lloret works from above to the bell, walking away with a decision win.

Team Spain has the last laugh with the heavyweight moral victory, but Team Russian Legion wins the meet, 3-2.

Best Match**: Carlos Valeri vs. Yuri Ivlev

Worst Match**: Rogent Lloret vs. Akmed Sultanov

**(based on footage aired)

Now two months in, it’s fair to say that M-1 Challenge, as pre-taped one-hour MMA programming, is far superior to predecessors like IFL and BodogFIGHT.  Editing five matches into less than 60 minutes while keeping the integrity of the event is not an easy task.  That said, M-1 Challenge has provided great back-and-forth MMA action, especially considering that there are no household names fighting.  Announce team Sean Wheelock and Jimmy Smith are enthusiastic and knowledgeable about what’s going on in the ring.  Their chemistry is the best this side of Goldberg and Rogan.

For those of you in the Kansas City, MO area, M-1-sanctioned action comes to the U.S. at Harrahs Voodoo Lounge on Wednesday, October 29th.  Two meets will occur: Team Japan vs.Team Spain and Team South Korea vs. Team France, as well as UFC / Affliction veteran Whitehead and hometown hero Bobby Voelker in superfight action.  Tickets are available at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 816-931-3330.  Visit http://www.TitanEntertainment.com for more information.

Next week, Team USA takes on Team France, from Tokyo, Japan.

M-1 Challenge: Team Japan vs. Team Russia Legion

Posted in M-1 Challenge, TV Reports with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 10, 2008 by jaytan716

M-1 Challenge is the latest MMA organization to acquire US TV distribution, broadcasting 20 episodes of their 2008 international tournament on HD-Net.  And although the Russian promotion has existed for over a decade, it’s only recently gained notice in North America, mostly due to promotion head Vadim Finkelstein moonlighting as the manager of M-1’s poster boy, Fedor Emelianenko.

This year, M-1 borrows from the late IFL’s team-vs.-team format, dividing 11 different “national” teams into two different blocks (Group A and Group B) and pitting them against each other in a round-robin tournament.  The countries involved are France, Finland, Germany (aka “Team Europe”), Holland, Japan, South Korea, Spain, the United States, and Russia, which features two teams, Russian Legion and Russian Red Devil.  Currently, Team Finland leads in Group A, with a 4-1 victory over Team South Korea.  In Group B, Team Holland rules with a five-match straight sweep over Team Germany.

The rules are mostly PRIDE-based, with three judges scoring two five-minute rounds (with the possibility of a third round in the event of a draw).  Elbows to the head or the throat of an opponent are illegal, as is kicking or kneeing the head of a grounded opponent.  And much like the IFL, team rankings are based on team victories, followed by cumulative individual match victories.

We pick up tournament coverage with episode four, where Team Japan faces off against Team Russia Legion.  This event took place live at the Ice Palace in St. Petersburg, Russia, on April 3rd of this year.

This week’s show opens with a quick recap of the previous event, when Team Finland dominated Team South Korea with a clear-cut 4-1 victory.  Standing out in that clash was heavyweight Jarno Nurminen and welterweight Janne Tulirinta, both of whom who scored dominating TKO victories.

Calling the shots for M-1’s English broadcast are Sean Wheelock (Major League Soccer, PRIDE 34) on play-by-play and Jimmy Smith (Fight Nation) as color commentator.

Lightweight Division:  Daisuke Nakamura (Team Japan) vs. Yuri Ivlev (Team Russia Legion)

Nakamura is a Kiyoshi Tamura protégé who built up an impressive record in Japan’s DEEP promotion, but recently fought as a gun-for-hire journeyman since 2006, fighting in Cage Rage, PRIDE Bushido, K-1 Heros, and Dream.  Ivlev is a homegrown M-1 fighter.

Round 2 (joined in progress):

As the round opens, color commentator Jimmy Smith notes that Russia has the home team advantage, and that, going into the second of a two-round match, Nakamura should be motivated to prevent the fight from going to a judges’ decision.  Nakamura pays homage to his pro wrestling roots by sporting black trunks, shin pads, and wrestling boots with his name down the side.  The action is 90% standing, with Ivlev and Nakamura trading punches and knees.  There’s few combinations, and both fighters strangely keep their hands low.  In the last minute, Nakamura goes for a kimura, then an armbar, until the bell rings.

Ironically enough, the judges award the match to Nakamura.  Japan is up 1-0.  Nobody awards Jimmy Smith “best announcer” honors.

Welterweight Division:  Ken Hamamura (Team Japan) vs. Islam Karimov (Team Russia Legion)

Not the closest of match-ups, as Hamamura boasts a 13-4-1 record (mostly in DEEP), while Karimov comes in with a 3-1-1 record.  Sherdog has different records for them, but it still indicates a huge 13-match experience discrepancy.  Both weigh in several pounds less than the 170-pound weight limit.  Karimov is a kickboxer, while Hamamura claims a karate background (and a steady record of wins in a five-year career).

Round 1:

The first round offers a lot of solid up-and-down, back-and-forth action.  Karimov drops Hamamura with a sharp right to the temple, pouncing with right fists to try and finish the match early.  Hamamura scrambles, tries for a leglock, and eventually makes it back to his feet.  Karimov takes it to the floor again with a nice sambo throw.  Hamamura escapes again and the two trade leather.  Karimov is the proverbial house of fire, but Hamamura uses his height and a Muay Thai clinch to nullify the attack.  Another sambo hip toss from Karimov, but Hamamura transitions to a heel hook, then works his way into Karimov’s guard.  Hamamura ground-and-pounds his way to Karimov’s back, but the Russian escapes just before the bell ends the round.

Round 2

Hamamura’s style somewhat resembles Lyoto Machida’s, keeping his distance and attacking with kicks from afar.  Karimov is tired, but keeps the pressure on Hamamura, who takes the Russian down with a hip toss and gets full mount.  There’s not much behind Hamamura’s punches, but Karimov is simply covering up and not working for an escape.  Hamamura continues with his G&P assault until the ref stops the match.    Ken Hamamura wins by TKO at 3:09 in round two.  Japan is up 2-0.

Middleweight Division:  Yuta Watanabe (Team Japan) vs. Ansar Chalangov (Team Russia Legion)

Chalangov is trying to shake a three-match losing streak to Thiago Alves, Josh Koscheck, and Nick Thompson, respectively.  Going against conventional wisdom, Chalangov has moved up a weight class.  Watanabe is a Tsuyoshi Kosaka protégé and the third straight fighter to hail from DEEP.  M-1 and DEEP have a longstanding history of talent trade, which explains the Team Japan roster.

Round 1:

Watanabe and Chalangov feel each other out until Chalangov shoots for a takedown.  Watanabe drops Chalangov with a looping right, then follows-through with guillotine and triangle chokes.  Chalangov escapes with a slam.  The two struggle for ground control.  Watanabe takes Chalangov’s back and keeps control with a body triangle.  Watanabe gets a rear naked choke and finishes Chalangov in the first round.  Big upset victory for Watanabe, and just a big upset for Chalangov.

Yuta Watanabe wins by submission in 2:32 of round one.  Japan wins the team competition, 3-0.

At this point, Japan’s three straight wins earns them team victory for the night, but with individual match outcomes also affecting team standings, Team Russia Legion is still adamant about scoring a few wins before the night is done.  Fedor’s Red Devil team had the same problems in their first round meet against Team France.

Light Heavyweight Division:  Yuji Sakuragi (Team  Japan) vs. Besiki Gerinava (Team Russia Legion)

Gerinava goes into this match looking to continue his unblemished 4-0 record.  Sakuragi has four times the experience on Gerinava, but with a 9-13-1 Sherdog record, it would appear that Sakuragi is being brought in to be another victim.

Round 2 (joined in progress):

According to the announcers, Sakuragi lost the first round.  Gerinava attacks with several bombs and follows up with a judo throw that almost sends Sakuragi out of the ring.  Gerinava goes for a leglock, but Sakuragi escapes.  Referee Yuji Shimada orders a stand-up.  Gerinava takes Sakuragi down and gets full mount.  Ground & pound is in effect until Gerinava gets an armbar.  But he’s in bad position and against the ropes.  Yuji Shimada stands them up again.

Gerinava scores another takedown and goes into Sakuragi’s guard.  Gerinava pounds Sakuragi’s midsection with rough body shots.  Another stand-up, another takedown, and more G&P.  Sakuragi reverses and takes the mount, then slaps on an armbar in the last few seconds of the match.

Basiki Gerinava wins a unanimous decision, turning Team Russia Legion’s luck for the better.

Heavyweight Division:  Katsuhisa Fujii (Team Japan) vs. Akhmet Sultanov (Team Russia Legion)

Fujii is 35-years old and is 8-13-1.  Sultanov is 27-years old and 2-0.  Ahem.  Both Katsuhisa and Sultanov come from wrestling backgrounds.  Kazuhisa is a Kazayuki Fujita protégé, and is wearing wrestling shoes.  Announcer Sean Wheelock notes that kicks to the head are NOT legal if wearing shoes or boots.  That’s one weapon less in the arsenal of “the other Mr. Fujii.”

Round 1:

Mr. Fujii takes Sultanov down, but the Russian heavyweight reverses and takes Mr. Fujii’s back.   Sultanov sinks his hooks in and goes for a rear naked choke.  He steps over for an armbar and gets the tapout at 0:38 in round one.

Final team score is Japan 3, Russia Legion 2.  Team Japan scores an upset victory over Team Russia Legion with a sweep of the first three matches.  But Team Russia Legion comes back with a moral victory, stealing the light heavyweight and heavyweight bouts.

As TV programming, M-1 Challenge faces similar as the IFL: needing to edit matches down for time, a lack of recognizable (or English-speaking) fighters, little opportunity to showcase

fighters’ personalities, and as-yet unproven team-vs.-team concept.  That said, Sean Wheelock and Jimmy Smith are a very impressive team, especially considering that M-1 Challenge is their first pairing together.  M-1’s live production value, with the white ring, referee uniform, overhead lighting grid, fighter gloves, and ring entrance design clearly is PRIDE-inspired.

M-1 won’t pose any threats to the American MMA scene anytime soon, but in hosting a year-long tournament that involves 10 different countries, Vadim Finkelstein’s promotion is breaking some new ground in the international MMA scene.

Best Match: Yuta Watanabe vs. Ansar Chalangov

Worst Match: Yuji Sakuragi vs. Besiki Gerinava

**(based on footage aired)

Next week, Team USA takes on Team Spain, from Gran Canadia, Spain.